Carmelita Lamb

Carmelita Lamb

Associate Dean of Liffrig Family School of Education & Behavioral Sciences

Biography

Dr. Carmelita Lamb is a native of Texas; she was born in Austin, and raised in San Antonio. She is of mixed blood, Hispanic and an enrolled member of the Lipan Apache Band of South Texas. She received her PhD in Institutional Analysis/Occupational Adult Education in 2009 from North Dakota State University. The title of her dissertation was Cohort model learning communities: The tribal college perspective of best practices in teacher education.  

Lamb serves as a grantee trainer for the U.S. Department of Education and is the Principal Investigator (collective awards 2.5M) for Native American Education Leadership Program (NAELP) under the direction of the U.S. Office of Indian Education. She is a curriculum designer/consultant for Honoring Tribal Legacies (National Park Service, Lewis and Clark Trail) in partnership with Dr. Stephanie Wood, Oregon State University. Her research interests are in Native American self-determination, providing higher education opportunities for marginalized populations, and minority serving institutions of higher education. Lamb serves as the Associate Dean of the Liffrig Family School of Education and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Mary.

Lamb, C. (2018)  Review of book: Honoring our Teachers Eds. Reyhner, J., Martine, J., Lockard, L. Gilbert, W.S. Flagstaff, AZ: Northern Arizona University Press. 

Lamb, C. (2016). Struggle and Success: The state of teacher education at tribal colleges and universities. Tribal College Journal 27(3).

Lamb, C. (2016). Teacher Education at Tribal Colleges and Universities: A Talking Circle of department chairs and education warriors. In: E. Petchauer Editor, Teacher Education at Minority Serving Institutions: Programs, Policies, and Social Justice. Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press. 

Lamb, C. (2015, May 2). Tribal college governance. [Review of the book Success Academy: How Native American students prepare for college (and how colleges can prepare for them), by M. Benton Lee]. Tribal College Journal 26(4). 

Lamb, C. (2014). Growing our own:  A sustainable approach to teacher education at Turtle Mountain Community College. Tribal College Journal 26(2).

Lamb, C. (2013, October 31). Tribal and behavioral health. [Review of the book American Indian Educators in Reservation Schools by T. Huffman].  Tribal College Journal 25(2).

Lamb, C. (2013). Cohort model learning communities: The tribal college perspective of best practices in teacher education. In Yazzie-Mintz, E. (ed.), Mellon Tribal College Research Journal (pp.28-76) Denver, CO: American Indian College Fund Press.

Lamb, C. (2012). TMCC takes multicultural education on the road. Tribal College Journal 23(4).

Lamb, C. (2010). Turtle Mountain teachers train change agents. Tribal College Journal 22 (2). 

Lamb, C. (2010). Native Ways of Knowing: The Student Perspective of Teacher Education in Tribal Colleges_ Paper presented at Native American Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA) conference, Tucson, AZ. 

Lamb, C. (2009) Cohort model learning communities: The tribal college perspective of best practices in teacher education. Paper presented at Native American Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA) Conference, Minneapolis, MN.

Marin, T. & Lamb, C. (2008). From Turtle Mountain to the Badlands:  Learning to teach native ways of knowing. The Tribal College Journal 19 (4).

Marin, T. & Lamb, C. (2007). Using NASA research to teach in the Native Ways of Knowing secondary science teacher education project. The Earth Observer 19 (2).

Lamb, C. (2007), August) Native Ways of Knowing-secondary science teacher education project, sponsored by the National Science Foundation. Poster presented at the Joint Annual Meeting, Washington, DC.

Lamb, C. (2006, May) The phenomenon of stopping-out in American Indian post-secondary education. Paper presented at the Higher Education Resources Organization Meeting, Bismarck, ND